Nexus and Crux by Ramez Naam

Nexus by Ramez NaamEvery once in a while, I read a book whose vision of the future makes me sit back and think Ah yes, this is how it will be. Accelerando by Charles Stross dealt with the acceleration of technological development. Daemon by Daniel Suarez depicted how a computer can manipulate the world around it.

Nexus and Crux, the two techothrillers from Ramez Naam, do that for neural implants, future technology that provides an interface between our brains and the outside world.

I read an advance review copy of Naam’s Crux, a sequel that follows tight on the heels of Nexus. (Available on Amazon and everywhere books are sold.) Both books revolve around a technology called Nexus, a nanotech drug that interfaces with the human brain. It allows a user to run apps in their brain, to exercise conscious control over their mood, augment their intelligence, and communicate telepathically with other Nexus users.

But even as this all-powerful technology improves the lives of Crux by Ramez Naammillions by fixing debilitating mental illnesses, helping monks meditate, facilitating more powerful group consciousness and thought, it is also restricted by governments, abused by criminals, and consequently leads to power struggles.

Crux is an adrenaline filled ride through the near-term future. Set on a global stage in a near-future world where the United States tries to tight restricts technology through shadowy intelligence organizations, Nexus and Crux run the gamut of post-human technology: human-brain uploads, military body upgrades, nanotechnology, and artificial intelligence, but the definite star of the show is the Nexus drug and its impact on increasing the power of the human mind.

I recommend both books, although Crux won’t make sense without the setup ofNexus, so go read both. You’ll be left realizing the future will look much like Ramez Naam’s books, full of both beautiful and very scary possibilities.

William Hertling is the author of the best-selling technothrillers Avogadro Corp, A.I. Apocalypse, and The Last Firewall. His first novel for kids age 8-12, The Case of the Wilted Broccoli, came out this summer. A writer and computer programmer, he lives in Portland, Oregon. You can follow him on twitter or sign up for his mailing on williamhertling.com.

About erikwecks

Erik Wecks is a full time writer and blogger living in Vancouver, Washington. He is an author of both non-fiction and fiction, as has been a contributor to the GeekDad blog on Wired.com and LitReactor.com. He writes on a wide range of topics. When not waxing poetic on various aspects of fiscal responsibility, he tends toward the geeky. When not poised over the keyboard, Erik loves to spend time with his family. He is married to an angel, Jaylene, who has taught him more than anyone else about true mercy and compassion. They are the parents of three wonderful girls. As a group they like swimming at the local pool, gardening, reading aloud, playing piano, and beating each other soundly at whatever table top game is handy.
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